MSNBC paid Jesse Ventura $10 Million to Keep Quiet on Iraq

Jesse VEntura talks to RT’s Lee Camp © YouTube / Redacted Tonight

Former Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura told RT’s Lee Camp that his anti-war views were so unpopular at MSNBC, the network paid him something to the tune of ten million dollars to “keep quiet.”
After leaving office in 2003, Ventura began a weekly cable TV show, ‘Jesse Ventura’s America,’ on MSNBC. However, the show was dropped only a few months after it began. For Ventura, the show was canceled for one reason.

“They got rid of me because I opposed the invasion of Iraq,” he told Redacted Tonight’s Lee Camp. “Our government allowed no media at all to speak out against the invasion of Iraq, you were told it’s off limits basically.” While dissent may not have gone down well at MSNBC at the time, jingoism did, with host Joe Scarborough calling protesters “leftist stooges for anti-American causes,” and pundit Michael Savage suggesting they “are absolutely committing sedition, or treason.”

Ventura’s contract stipulated that he not work for any other media outlet, and the Vietnam veteran and former pro wrestler honored it, taking “close to ten times” that of a million-dollar paycheck and keeping quiet. “I then bought my home in Mexico and I almost named it ‘Casa MSNBC,’” he joked to Camp.

Over a decade later, the mainstream media is still pushing the same line, Ventura says, recalling how the network endorsed President Donald Trump’s airstrikes on Syria as “beautiful,” and a much-needed humanitarian intervention against “the Assad regime.”

“I spent six years in the Navy SEALs,” Ventura thundered. “I’ve never seen a missile deliver food, medicine and blankets. They blow up and kill things.”

Watch the full video below, also featuring corporate journalists finally turning on each other for two years of ‘Russiagate’ conspiracies and America’s need for a viable third party.

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